Normally when a woman is about to give birth and goes into labor, you’ll hear the term “my water broke”. Actually they are referring to the amniotic fluid inside the amniotic sac where the baby floats and breathes, and once it broke it means it’s time to see the world.

However, it is rare to see a baby being born still inside the amniotic sac which normally burst during normal delivery or C-section. This mom experienced this incredibly rare phenomenon after she prematurely gave birth to her baby via C-section, but they were not prepared for what they were about to witness.

The baby was delivered with the amniotic sac still intact which is a rare case.

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Inside the sac, the baby can be seen curled up as it moves and responds to the touch of the medic.

The doctor then cut open the sac and the baby takes his first breath. Such a remarkable sight to see.

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The baby cries as the doctor gently clears his airways and umbilical cord.

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Here’s the amazing footage:

The amniotic sac is a bag of clear, pale fluid inside the womb where the unborn baby develops and grows. The fluid helps to cushion the baby from injury, and provides it with fluids so it can breathe and swallow.

It starts to form and fill with fluid within days of a woman conceiving. Amniotic fluid is mainly water, but from about week 10 onwards, the baby passes small amounts of urine into the fluid. The amount of amniotic fluid increases gradually during pregnancy until about week 38, when it reduces slightly until the baby is born.

Related: Twin Babies Think They Are Still in The Womb

Being born ‘en caul’ is the term used when the child is born within an intact amniotic sac, such as the case in this story. It is also known as a ‘veiled birth’. Most en caul births occur in premature babies and it only happens to one out of 80,000 births.

‘Caul’ literally means ‘helmeted head’ or ‘veil’ and a baby with the caul is called the ‘caulbearer’.

H/T: Daily Mail via Diply